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Apply Pipeline

Introduction

The Apply Pipeline is the part of Cloud Platform that continuously deploys the environments repo into Cloud Platform’s Kubernetes cluster and AWS account. Service teams typically define their Kubernetes namespace and AWS resources in the environments repo, and and the Apply Pipeline is what gets it applied.

(Don’t confuse it with the application pipelines, which are created and managed by service teams. These deploy the Kubernetes resources which make up the application. The application in turn relies on the resources created by the Apply Pipeline - the namespace the application runs in and AWS services that it uses.)

How it operates

The Apply Pipeline is triggered when a Pull Request on the environments repo is merged to main. The Apply Pipeline deploys the changes to whichever environments were changed in the PR.

Essentially it does:

kubectl -n your-namespace apply -f *.yaml
cd resources
terraform plan
terraform apply

It takes a minute to start the job and then 1 to 2 minutes to run.

Viewing the Apply Pipeline

You can see the running of the Apply Pipeline in Concourse’s “Apply-namespace-changes-live-1” pipeline

Usage:

  • Sign in using your GitHub identity
  • Select the build corresponding to your PR merge (other people’s changes to environments also show up here). The latest build is at the top, but you can also identify your one by the merge commit hash.
  • Select task: apply-namespace-changes to see the logs, where terraform is applied.

Success and failures

The colour of the header is green if the job was successful, or red for failure. A failing apply can disrupt other Service Teams who wish to apply their environment changes. So in this case, the Cloud Platform team will work quickly, hopefully with the PR author involved, to resolve or reverse changes, to resolve the failure.

Questions

If you have questions about the running of the Apply Pipeline, ask the team in #ask-cloud-platform.

This page was last reviewed on 24 June 2021. It needs to be reviewed again on 24 September 2021 .
This page was set to be reviewed before 24 September 2021. This might mean the content is out of date.